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Graduate student tuition taxation

It appears the final GOP bill will not make tuition remission for graduate students taxable.

Sen. Mike Rounds, Republican of South Dakota, told Bloomberg: “Folks who are in grad school will feel pretty good about the final result.”

Story here.

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Philosophers’ Imprint Seeking Editors

Daily Nous has the full story here.

Imprint is an impressive open access journal. Its mission statement is vital reading. The journal deserves our support. Consider helping them out.

I’ll cut and paste their Mission Statement below. It offers a vision of what the future of journals in philosophy could be like if we banded together to help out journals such as Phil Imprint and together work to transfer prestige to such journals. (more…)

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CFP: World Government

Call for Papers: World Government

Special issue of Philosophical Papers

Guest editor: Attila Tanyi (University of Tromsø)

Theorizing about world government has a long history. Formulations of some version of the idea already appear in Chinese, Indian as well as ancient Greek thought and later supporters (in Western philosophy) include Dante and Erasmus (while others, such as Bentham and Kant, offered qualified support only).

Today the idea appears to enjoy a new renaissance. This is perhaps not surprising. The world is encountering several global existential challenges, among them climate change, global injustice, and the threat of (nuclear) war. Some think that there is only one adequate answer to these challenges: to create a world state that governs the entire globe. Others think that creating a world state is not a good idea for a variety of reasons, both moral as well as non-moral (such as political or pragmatic).

(more…)

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By In News and Events Comments Off on CFP: Special Issue of Public Affairs Quarterly on “Race and Public Policy”

CFP: Special Issue of Public Affairs Quarterly on “Race and Public Policy”

Call for Paper for a Special Issue of Public Affairs Quarterly on “Race and Public Policy”.

Details here.

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(Additional) Reasons to Rule out Initiating Sexual Relationships with Those You Have Power Over

I want to gesture towards some considerations that tell against initiating sexual relationships with people you hold real professional power over. Perhaps such relationships are already agreed on all hands to be quite problematic. If so, this post will just urge new (to me) reasons for settled conclusions. If not, perhaps these considerations might tip the balance for some.

Likely you have heard by now that LOTS of people have been posting “Me too” on Facebook and Twitter. Most of these posts contain something like this by way of explanation: “If everyone who has been sexually harassed or assaulted wrote ‘Me too’ as a status, we might give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem.”

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By In Applied Ethics Comments (3)

The Place of Sports in the Academy

This post can also be found here.

“As previously acknowledged by the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Provost, student/athletes are obligated to meet both their academic and athletic commitments. It is possible that required competition may occasionally conflict with class schedules and/or other academic responsibilities. We would appreciate your assistance in providing the student with an opportunity to complete any assignments, exams, and/or projects that will be missed during their absence from your course.

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By In The Profession Comments (13)

The Wine Spectator Model of Philosophy Publication

It is radical but my idea is that one submits to ranking houses (which could remain the existing journals). Every paper submitted will be published online and ranked. You may submit a paper only once. You fix it up in light of (presumably more careful and more numerous) referee reports, but then it is published with a numerical ranking. Advantages include 1) less refereeing overall and so, potentially, more careful refereeing from people who more closely specialize in the area. 2) much quicker time from submission to publication, eliminating pressure to choose where to submit on strategic grounds, 3) encourages people to finish papers before submitting them, rather than treating submissions as entering a lottery 4) as is the difference between just in and just out of a journal is enormous–this system allows one to get credit for “very close to making it into Phil Rev”. Call this the Wine Spectator Model.

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