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By In News and Events Comments Off on World Government or Else? Workshop in Zurich

World Government or Else? Workshop in Zurich

WORLD GOVERNMENT OR ELSE?

The world is encountering several global challenges: climate change, global injustice, and war

particularly stand out. Some think that there is only one adequate answer to these challenges:

to create a world state that governs the entire globe. Others think that creating a world state is

not a good idea for different reasons: it is unrealistic (given as the world it is now dominated

by territorial nation states); it is undesirable (it could lead to global tyranny and/or force upon

humanity a homogeneity that we don’t want); it is ineffective (there are other solutions to these

problems, such as stronger nation states, supra-national organizations, stronger regional

cooperation). This two-day workshop (June 13, 2017 – June 14, 2017) will examine the question

whether we need a world government (and in what form), both from theoretical and from

empirical angles.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: The workshop will last for two days. The first day (June 13) will be

spent at the Collegium Helveticum, Zurich (Switzerland), the second day (June 14) in the

Zukunftskolleg, Konstanz (Germany). A shuttle bus service will be provided between Zurich

and Konstanz on the morning and evening of June 14.

Registration to attend is recommended. Please register with Attila Tanyi by emailing to

tanyi@collegium.ethz.ch

For further details, including a detailed programme when available, see

http://www.attilatanyi.com/future-events.html

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By In Announcements Comments (3)

Valerie Tiberius’s Advice to her Friend, Philosophy. Plus Important Survey Data from over 2500 Philosophers.

A draft of Valerie Tiberius’s Presidential Address at the Central Division of the APA is linked to below. The text below is her teaser for the address. Her advice to Philosophy is informed by important data, revealed below, from a survey of over 2500 philosophers.

Of this piece Valerie writes “I am really hoping that the survey (and my discussion of the results) will be helpful to other philosophers.  I’m very grateful to the editors of PEASoup for linking to it and hosting a discussion.  I’d love to hear your comments and I would be glad to answer questions. (I might be a little slow to answer certain questions about data, or to respond to requests for data, since I’ll have to ask my collaborator about these).”

Here now is Valerie:

I have been writing about well-being and about how to think about well-being when we are trying to help our friends.  In this context, I believe we should focus on the values of the person we are trying to help and on how those values could be improved in light of shared norms and the facts about personality and environment.  Well-being, on this view, is success in terms of appropriate values over time, or “value fulfillment” as I call it.

Given my research, I started thinking… what if PHILOSOPHY were my friend?  I might worry.  Philosophy, what are you doing with your life?  You’re in the news, and not in a good way.  Thinking about philosophy as my friend led me to wonder what would happen if I took my own approach to helping and applied it here.  And that led me to creating “The Value of Philosophy Survey”.  My hope in creating the survey was to find out what philosophers value about philosophy. I anticipated finding some conflicts among these values and my goal was to use this information to recommend a “healthy” and sustainable path that we can follow, given our values, given what philosophy is like (our “personality”) and given the academic, economic and political environment in which we have to work.  My presidential address is the results of these efforts.  It reports findings from the survey and recommends a path forward that I call the “broaden and balance” path.

The Well-Being of Philosophy

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By In Call For Papers, News and Events Comments (1)

CFP: “The Social Philosophy and Business Ethics of the American Wedding.”

“The Social Philosophy and Business Ethics of the American Wedding.”

 

This conference is about weddings themselves – not about marriage, in general. It will take place at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia on the weekend of November 3-5

 

Select conference presentations will be given by invited speakers, including:

David Velleman

Samantha Brennan

Alastair Norcross

Elizabeth Brake

Daniel Halliday

 

Additionally, the program is open to submissions of long abstracts for 5-7 open presentation slots on the program.

 

We are hoping to solicit abstracts for papers answering questions such as:

  • Is it wrong to make promises that we know we are statistically unlikely to keep?
  • What role does an audience play in promise-making? (And breaking)
  • Commercially, do wedding markets involve wrongful exploitation? If so – whatand whom is being wrongfully exploited?
  • Do wedding markets give rise to problems in business and consumer ethics? (e.g. false advertising; purchasing of products from immoral markets – e.g. diamonds)
  • Are anti-discrimination laws that (arguably) curtail religious freedom appropriately applied in consumer markets related to weddings: e.g. wedding cakes?
  • People spend a lot of money, time, and emotional energy on weddings. Is there any philosophical justification for it? What role do events like this play in the narrative of our lives? Our cultural heritage?
  • Do we owe it to our parents to have weddings – given that there are few other moments of public recognition for the parents of adult children in American social life?
  • Do idealizations about a bride’s body (idealizations about size, age, and virginity) prove to be oppressive (and is there anything interestingly new a philosopher might add to this discussion)?
  • People make religious and cultural compromises when planning their weddings. (e.g. religious compromises to parents) Do these compromises threaten cultural heritage? Do they result in commitments of bad faith?

 

Submit abstracts of 500-750 words to both Brian Berkey and Hallie Liberto at bberkey@wharton.upenn.edu and hallie.liberto@uconn.edu

Deadline for Submission: May 31st, 2017.

Decisions Announced: June 15th, 2017.

Limited funding for travel is available from the conference budget, and will be distributed according to need.

Depending on the breadth and quality of submissions, the conference topic will be the focus of a special issue of Social Theory and Practice, edited by Hallie Liberto. Authors of accepted papers, as well as other highly ranked submissions, will be invited to submit full papers for consideration in the journal.

If you would like to submit a paper solely for consideration in the special issue of Social Theory and Practice, and not for consideration for the conference, please send in your paper by September 1st, 2017.

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By In Ideas, Political Philosophy Comments (3)

Relational Egalitarianism and Politics

This is the second installment of PEA Soup’s partnership with Bleeding Heart Libertarians. In this series folks from BHL share their thoughts with Soup readers. This post is by Jessica Flanigan (University of Richmond).

(more…)

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By In Normative Ethics, Uncategorized Comments (2)

Favorite papers on: Perfectionism or Neo-Aristotealian Ethics

Hoping folks will share with the group their favorite papers on the topic of Perfectionism or Neo-Aristotelian Ethics. Perhaps people might add what level they think the paper is most appropriate for (grad seminar, undergrad intro, etc.). A short explanation of what the paper says or what makes it great might be useful as well.

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By In Metaethics, Normative Ethics, Uncategorized Comments (6)

Favorite readings on: Subjectivism

Hoping folks will share with the group their favorite papers on the topic of subjectivism. Perhaps people might add what level they think the paper is most appropriate for (grad seminar, undergrad intro, etc.). A short explanation of what the paper says or what makes it great might be useful as well.

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By In Applied Ethics, The Profession, Uncategorized Comments Off on Thoughts on Divesting from For-Profit Prisons

Thoughts on Divesting from For-Profit Prisons

Considerations in favor of supporting such divestment and advice about how to get started here.

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