Author

By In News and Events Comments Off on Visiting Fellows Program: Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy

Visiting Fellows Program: Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy

The Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy is soliciting applications for its Visiting Fellows program. This program is intended to attract scholars in law and philosophy who can contribute to the life of the Rutgers law and philosophy community. We welcome scholars from any stage of their career who would like to spend a semester or the academic year at Rutgers Law in Camden, New Jersey, adjacent to Philadelphia. We will provide office space, a computer and IT support, and a very modest research stipend. Applicants will need to provide their own funding.

The Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy is among the most active such centers in the nation. In the past twelve months alone, we have hosted conferences on criminal law theory, law and neuroscience, and tort theory. A full list of the events that we have hosted is available here: http://lawandphil.rutgers.edu/past-conferences.

To apply, please email lawandphil@rutgers.edu with your CV.

Love this idea? Nominate it for the Annual PEA Soup Awards!

Read more

By In News and Events Comments Off on Rutgers symposium on Sen’s Idea of Justice — April 15-16

Rutgers symposium on Sen’s Idea of Justice — April 15-16

The Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy, based at the Rutgers School of Law-Camden, will host a two-day symposium on Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen's The Idea of Justice (Harvard 2009) on Friday April, 15th and Saturday, April 16th 2011.  The conference will feature six presentations on Sen's recent book and its themes by leading figures in political philosophy:  David Estlund (Brown), Samuel Freeman (Penn), Gerald Gaus (Arizona), Erin Kelly (Tufts), Henry Richardson (Georgetown), and Debra Satz (Stanford). Professor Sen will also attend. The symposium's proceedings will be published in a special issue of the Rutgers Law Journal.  Schedule and registration details appear after the fold.

(more…)

Love this idea? Nominate it for the Annual PEA Soup Awards!

Read more

By In Uncategorized Comments (7)

A (Modestly Deflationary) Contractualist Accommodation of Interpersonal Aggregation?

A great deal of ink has been spilled attempting to show that contractualism, alternately, can or cannot accommodate “numbers” in a plausible way. Contractualism aspires to provide an attractive and theoretically robust alternative to consequentialism and the unrestricted interpersonal aggregation that it implies (foundationally anyway), but the abiding worry about the contractualist approach to aggregation has been that it proves too much: while it rejects appealing to numbers in some cases where that rejection seems correct, it also rejects appealing to numbers where numbers seem clearly relevant or even dispositive. What I want to suggest here is a modestly deflationary way that contractualism might be able to accommodate the relevance of numbers.

(more…)

Love this idea? Nominate it for the Annual PEA Soup Awards!

Read more

By In News and Events Comments Off on Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy Inaugural Lecture in Law and Ethics

Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy Inaugural Lecture in Law and Ethics

The Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy is pleased to announce that Margaret Little of Georgetown University will deliver its inaugural annual Lecture in Law and Ethics on Thursday, March 5th at 12:30pm, entitled "Intimate Assistance: Re-Thinking Abortion in Law and Morality."  The Lecture is free and open to the public and will take place at the Rutgers School of Law-Camden.


Professor Little is an Associate Professor in the Philosophy Department at Georgetown University and a Senior Research Scholar at Georgetown's Kennedy Institute of Ethics, a think-tank specializing in bioethics. She did graduate work in philosophy at Oxford, Princeton, and Berkeley and came to Georgetown after two years' teaching at Bryn Mawr College. Her work falls predominately under the broad umbrella of ethics, focusing on moral particularism, moral epistemology, motivation, and feminist bioethics. Professor Little co-edited a collection of essays entitled Moral Particularism in 2000, she is finishing a book on abortion entitled Compelling Intimacy: Abortion, Law, & Morality, and she is beginning work on a new book on feminism, moral theory, and bioethics, all with Oxford University Press. 

The Lecture in Law and Ethics, sponsored by the Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy, will be an annual public lecture featuring a leading scholar who works at the lively intersection of law and moral philosophy. We are delighted that Professor Margaret Little will be the inaugural speaker in the series. 

For more information, email: lawandphil@camlaw.rutgers.edu

Love this idea? Nominate it for the Annual PEA Soup Awards!

Read more

By In News and Events, Normative Ethics Comments Off on Rutgers conference: Human Rights in Theory and Practice

Rutgers conference: Human Rights in Theory and Practice

Conference: Human Rights in Theory and Practice
Date: Friday, October 3rd, 2008
Location: Rutgers University School of Law-Camden

Description:
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the United Nations in 1948, and in recognition of the UDHR’s 60th anniversary, the Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy will host a one-day conference featuring panels on a range of philosophical and legal aspects of human rights.

(more…)

Love this idea? Nominate it for the Annual PEA Soup Awards!

Read more

By In News and Events Comments Off on Kamm Symposium at Rutgers Law-Camden

Kamm Symposium at Rutgers Law-Camden

The Rutgers Institute for Law and Philosophy, based at the Law School in Camden, is pleased to announce a two-day symposium on F. M. Kamm’s Intricate Ethics: Rights, Responsibilities, and Permissible Harm (Oxford, 2007). The symposium will take place on Friday, February 22nd and Saturday, February 23rd, 2008. Frances Kamm, Littauer Professor Philosophy and Public Policy at Harvard, will attend, and presentations will be given by Shelly Kagan (Yale), Jeff McMahan (Rutgers), Gideon Rosen (Princeton), T. M. Scanlon (Harvard), and Seana Shiffrin (UCLA).

For further information, including registration details, please see the conference website:
http://www.lawandphil.rutgers.edu/theupconferences.html

Love this idea? Nominate it for the Annual PEA Soup Awards!

Read more

By In Normative Ethics Comments (14)

Specificationism

There’s an approach to a number of different domains in ethics, which we can call “specificationism”, that is seldom explicitly discussed but that I think warrants greater attention. Easily the most famous example of specificationism is found in the theory of rights and is owed to Thomson’s “A Defense of Abortion”, where she argues that no one has a right not to be killed simpliciter, only a right not to be killed unjustly. The basic idea is that the content of the right not to be killed – or indeed any right if we wish to generalize – must be specified to reflect what may and may not be done to the right-holder. The right not to be killed may clearly prohibit killing in some uncontroversial cases, but according to this picture it is rife with qualifications that reflect the many instances where one may be permissibly killed. This is a thumbnail sketch of a specified conception of rights, but the theory of rights is only one of the domains where the strategy of specification is employed.

(more…)

Love this idea? Nominate it for the Annual PEA Soup Awards!

Read more