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By In Academia, Applied Ethics Comments Off on Political Utopia: Promise or Peril? Ideal Theory Conference, April 25th-26th, 2014

Political Utopia: Promise or Peril? Ideal Theory Conference, April 25th-26th, 2014

For those of you interested in nonideal/ideal theory debates in political philosophy, I thought I’d let you know that Bowling Green State University is hosting a conference on the subject in three weeks. Registration is still open if you’re able to attend. We’re hoping to collect the papers in a volume following the conference. The line-up is great, and I expect the papers to advance the discussion.

Conference website here.

Conference flier here.

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By In Academia, News and Events, The Profession Comments Off on CFP: A Networking and Mentoring Workshop for Graduate Student Women in Philosophy

CFP: A Networking and Mentoring Workshop for Graduate Student Women in Philosophy

Call for Submissions

A Networking and Mentoring Workshop 
for Graduate Student Women in Philosophy

www.princeton.edu/~mentorship

Co-Directors: Elisabeth Camp, Elizabeth Harman, and Jill North

Female PhD and DPhil students and prospective students in philosophy are invited to submit papers on any topic in philosophy to participate in a workshop at Princeton University, August 21-24, 2014.

Thirty-five students will be selected to participate. Seven students will have their papers discussed; fourteen students will serve as commentators, and fourteen as chairs. In addition to the seven philosophy sessions, there will be five sessions at which professional advice is offered by twelve faculty mentors.

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By In Academia Comments (8)

Say what?

Always the non-conformist, I let my "special month" slip by without a post. I'd had been planning to contribute something about what Strawson's account of the reactive attitudes can do for consequentialists (a lot, I think, despite his being read by Darwall et. al. as an anti-consequentialist), but wasn't quite sure how to say it on here and still am not. But I thought that a fun idea for a thread might be made out of unexpected quotes from philosophers, i.e., ones where they are or seem to be saying something quite contrary to their well-known views. A few of you will have seen this quote from Mill (1831) in my Facebook feed last night:

". . . liberalism, which is for making every man his own guide & sovereign master,& letting him think for himself & do exactly as he judges best for himself, giving other men leave to persuade him if they can by evidence, but forbidding him to give way to authority; and still less allowing them to constrain him more than the existence & tolerable security of every man's person and property renders indispensably necessary. It is difficult to conceive a more thorough ignorance of man's nature, & of what is necessary for his happiness or what degree of happiness & virtue he is capable of attaining than this system implies."

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By In Academia, The Profession Comments (4)

We Need to be Better With Anonymous Refereeing

I've been doing a lot of refereeing for conferences, journals, prizes and such and a recent discussion with some of my co-referees leads me to want to post here about anonymous refereeing.  My main aim here will be to list some of the ways authors screw up in anonymizing papers and also to raise a question or two about trickier points of making a paper truly anonymous.  But I want to state out front that I think all refereed conferences should require that papers be anonymized when they are submitted. I know that in a small profession we will often have some idea who wrote papers, but I think we still ought to do the best we can within that constraint. (Continued below the fold.)

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By In Academia, News and Events Comments Off on CFP: Political Utopia: Promise or Peril? (Bowling Green Workshop in Ethics and Public Policy, April 25th-26th, 2014)

CFP: Political Utopia: Promise or Peril? (Bowling Green Workshop in Ethics and Public Policy, April 25th-26th, 2014)

I figure PEA soup readers will be interested in our new workshop topic! 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS 

The Bowling Green Workshop in Applied Ethics and Public
Policy 

Political Utopia:
Promise or Peril?
 

April 25th-26th, 2014 

The Bowling Green Workshop in Applied Ethics and Public
Policy will take place in Bowling Green, Ohio, April 25th-26th,
2014. The keynote speakers are David Estlund (Brown University) and Gerald Gaus
(University of Arizona). 

Those interested in presenting a paper are invited to submit
a 2-3 page abstract (double-spaced) by November
1, 2013
. We welcome submissions in all areas in applied ethics and
philosophical issues relevant to public policy. Special consideration will be
given to papers relevant to this year’s conference theme: on the prospects of
ideal and nonideal theory in contemporary political philosophy. The theme is to
be construed broadly, so we encourage submissions that draw on normative
ethics, metaethics and applied ethics. 

Only one submission per person is permitted. Abstracts will
be evaluated by a program committee and decisions made in November 2013. Please
direct all abstracts and queries to: pibarra@bgsu.edu 

Further information about the Workshop and previous workshops
are available on the workshop website (under construction): http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/phil/conferences/index.html

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By In Academia Comments Off on Thought now accepting submissions in Value Theory

Thought now accepting submissions in Value Theory

The new journal Thought is now accepting submissions in Value Theory (broadly interpreted, to include all of ethical theory and metaethics). I am the new Subject Editor for Value Theory submissions, assisted by an expert panel of referees (which includes a large number of PEA Soup contributors).

The aim of the journal is to publish short (<4500 words) original papers in philosophy. A description of the journal’s refereeing process can be found here. We aim to have a quick review time, with a commitment to giving authors a response within 8 weeks.

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By In Academia, The Profession Comments (1)

Philosophical Trajectories Official Launch

I am pleased to announce the official launch of Philosophical Trajectories, a data-collection project dedicated to helping philosophers learn from each other's publishing experiences. Many thanks to those of you who helped with the beta testing. I encourage everyone to participate; the more data we collect, the more useful the site will become. If you have any comments, questions or suggestions, please don't hesitate to email me.

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