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By In Academia, News and Events, The Profession Comments (5)

A New Era Begins: Multiple Submissions

Thom Brooks alerts us to a new moral and political philosophy journal, Public Reason.  The journal looks to be noteworthy for a number of reasons, not least of which is that it is an open-access e-journal, following the recent (and I think wholly positive) trend set by journals like Philosophers' Imprint and the Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy.  Moreover, back when JESP debuted, there was some excitement over the idea that philosophy had its first journal (or one of its first journals?) that was willing to consider papers that are simultaneously under submission elsewhere.  As was noted at the time, this policy loses some sizzle if it is the only journal willing to do this.  Apparently now that is no longer the case, though: Public Reason will also consider simultaneous submissions, so there are at least two journals to which those working in moral/political/social philosophy can simultaneously submit.

For philosophers concerned with various timetables that increase pressure to publish, this will no doubt be welcome news.  It will be interesting to see how interested parties, particularly referees, respond to this development.  (Some have been bothered by the idea of simultaneous submissions of book proposals.)  As a referee, I don't think I'd be too bothered to learn that I had been working up a report for a paper that was withdrawn from the journal I was working for because it had been accepted elsewhere.  But I also think it would be nice if authors took advantage of this opportunity–and thus of referees–only when they are under some sort of career deadline or other unique pressure to publish.

In related news, and again like JESP, Public Reason will be publishing discussion notes, in addition to regular articles and book reviews.

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By In Academia, The Profession Comments (22)

Puzzling Hiring Practices

Last year about this time, Kris McDaniel posted some important questions about the nature of the hiring process in philosophy, particular with respect to APA interviews.  I’d like to resurrect one of Kris’s questions for a new round of discussion as well as add another.

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By In Academia Comments (6)

Online Journals

I may be rehashing an old discussion–if so, please direct me to it–but I am trying to get a sense of what’s going on with the online journals in our field. I am asking with a number of different hats on all at the same time. I’ve got a crowded head these days! I’m involved in several publishing projects, I’m an academic administrator who gets called on for her views about publishing in my discipline, and I’m also trying to decide where to send my own work.

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By In Academia, The Profession Comments (4)

Blogging and the future of scholarship

I had a conversation earlier this year with a faculty member who was recently appointed to emeritus status at a research university, a story that says a lot about the research climate in philosophy then and now.

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By In Academia Comments (8)

Congratulations!

As reported by Leiter HERE , our fellow Pea-Souper David Sobel has accepted an offer from University from Nebraska, Lincoln to become a ‘Chambers Professor of Philosophy’ there. This is great news and we should all congratulate him!

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By In Academia, Applied Ethics Comments (16)

Purple hazing

I am an advisor to a student organization at my campus, and in order to recharter the organization, I recently had to sign a document stating that I had read and would agree to follow the university’s anti-hazing policy. It reads (in part):

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By In Academia Comments (16)

The battered and beleaguered APA: What now?

As many of you know, Michael Kelly, the executive director of the American Philosophical Association, recently resigned his position.  This is just the latest evidence that the APA, the principal organization of American philosophers, is in crisis:  The immediate precursor of Kelly’s resignation appears to be the APA’s handling (or perhaps, more succinctly, the Pacific Division leadership’s handling) of the controversy concerning whether to honor a local union’s call to boycott San Francisco’s Westin Hotel, the scheduled venue for the 2005 Pacific meeting.

But this is only another indication that a common impression within the field is correct: that the APA, at least at the national level, is adrift, and is failing to represent philosophy and the interests of philosophers well.  (Indeed, by my count, Kelly’s resignation makes three executive directors in five years, not exactly what an academic organization needs in the way of stable leadership.)  Indeed, my own informal survey of friends and colleagues within philosophy yielded few compliments of the APA and many concerns.

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