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By In Announcements Comments (3)

Valerie Tiberius’s Advice to her Friend, Philosophy. Plus Important Survey Data from over 2500 Philosophers.

A draft of Valerie Tiberius’s Presidential Address at the Central Division of the APA is linked to below. The text below is her teaser for the address. Her advice to Philosophy is informed by important data, revealed below, from a survey of over 2500 philosophers.

Of this piece Valerie writes “I am really hoping that the survey (and my discussion of the results) will be helpful to other philosophers.  I’m very grateful to the editors of PEASoup for linking to it and hosting a discussion.  I’d love to hear your comments and I would be glad to answer questions. (I might be a little slow to answer certain questions about data, or to respond to requests for data, since I’ll have to ask my collaborator about these).”

Here now is Valerie:

I have been writing about well-being and about how to think about well-being when we are trying to help our friends.  In this context, I believe we should focus on the values of the person we are trying to help and on how those values could be improved in light of shared norms and the facts about personality and environment.  Well-being, on this view, is success in terms of appropriate values over time, or “value fulfillment” as I call it.

Given my research, I started thinking… what if PHILOSOPHY were my friend?  I might worry.  Philosophy, what are you doing with your life?  You’re in the news, and not in a good way.  Thinking about philosophy as my friend led me to wonder what would happen if I took my own approach to helping and applied it here.  And that led me to creating “The Value of Philosophy Survey”.  My hope in creating the survey was to find out what philosophers value about philosophy. I anticipated finding some conflicts among these values and my goal was to use this information to recommend a “healthy” and sustainable path that we can follow, given our values, given what philosophy is like (our “personality”) and given the academic, economic and political environment in which we have to work.  My presidential address is the results of these efforts.  It reports findings from the survey and recommends a path forward that I call the “broaden and balance” path.

The Well-Being of Philosophy

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By In Announcements, Call For Papers, News and Events Comments Off on NOWAR 4: Call for Abstracts (Due March 15, 2017)

NOWAR 4: Call for Abstracts (Due March 15, 2017)

This is a call for abstracts for the fourth biennial New Orleans Workshop on Agency and Responsibility (NOWAR), to be held in New Orleans, LA, November 2-4, 2017. Abstracts are welcome on any topic having to do with agency and/or responsibility. Perspectives beyond just those from moral philosophy (e.g., psychology, legal theory, neuroscience, economics, metaphysics, and more) are welcome. To see more about the workshop’s general aims and other details, follow this link.

 

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By In Announcements, Call For Papers, Philosophy of Law Comments Off on Coercion Workshop: Call for Participants

Coercion Workshop: Call for Participants

 Applications are invited from current advanced doctoral students and recent PhD graduates/early career scholars to participate in a workshop on current issues in coercion, to be held on the campus of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, March 25-26, 2017.  This workshop occurs at the culmination of a SSHRC-funded project on “The Regulation of Coercion,” led by Scott Anderson of the University of British Columbia.  The workshop will feature the participation of and work by leading experts on coercion, including:

Michael Blake, U Washington
AJ Julius, UCLA
Niko Kolodny, UC Berkeley
Diana Tietjens Meyers, U Connecticut
Arthur Ripstein, U Toronto
Mathias Risse, Harvard
Laura Valentini, London School of Economics
Ekow Yankah, Cardozo School of Law

A syllabus of papers by the above participants and several others will be circulated in advance of the workshop, and all participants are expected to read the papers prior to attendance.  There will be no formal presentations or reading of papers at the workshop, in order to maximize time for discussion.  Participants are asked to be available to participate for the whole duration of the workshop (all day Saturday, March 25, and the morning of Sunday, March 26.)

Topics likely to be discussed at the workshop include:

  •  The concept and definition of coercion
  • Coercion and moral responsibility
  • Coercion, justice, and the state
  • Coercion and immigration/citizenship
  • Applied philosophical issues involving coercion

In order to ensure that emerging scholars are able to gain from this event, spaces have been reserved in this workshop for a small number of current PhD students and recent PhD graduates whose work relates to coercion and associated issues in ethics and social and political philosophy.  Successful applicants will have their expenses paid for transportation, accommodation, and meals during the two-day workshop.  (Details of these arrangements will be provided on request.)  There is no expectation for applicants to submit a paper or make a presentation during the workshop, but if you have work that might be of interest to the topics of the workshop, it will be considered for inclusion on the list of readings.

To apply to participate in the workshop, please send a message stating your interest to scott dot anderson (*at*) ubc dot ca, including the following information:

  1. Name, current and recent institutional affiliation(s), date of PhD expected or completed.
  2. A brief statement of up to 400 words explaining the relevance of coercion in your philosophical work, and/or the relevance of your work to thinking about the topic of coercion.
  3. A current CV (an informal or abbreviated CV from current graduate students is fine).
  4. If you have a piece of your writing you think might be suitable for discussion at the workshop, or that is relevant for understanding your interest in the topic of the workshop, you may send it as well (papers in draft form are perfectly acceptable for this purpose).  Submission of such writing is optional, however.
  5. The location from which you would be traveling here (as the cost of transportation may be a consideration outside for applications from outside of Canada or the U.S.).

We will make every effort to accommodate applicants requiring special arrangements to be able to attend; everyone who is interested is encouraged to apply regardless of such requirements.

Please submit your application for participation by Monday, January 30.  Invitations to accepted participants will be made as soon after this date as is feasible.  Questions about this workshop may also be directed to scott dot anderson (*at*) ubc dot ca.

Please encourage any likely interested persons to apply to this workshop.

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By In Announcements, Featured Philosophers Comments Off on A New Year of Featured Philosophers

A New Year of Featured Philosophers

Happy New Year!  I am happy to announce that we will have a regular series of Featured Philosophers this spring, and that we will be continue to broaden our line up to include junior professors and graduate students.

The first two posters this year will be Reid Blackman, who is an Assistant Professor at Colgate, and David Beglin, who is a finishing graduate student at UC – Riverside.  Reid’s post on role-based reasons and the problems they cause for reasons-internalists will go up tomorrow, so please stop by then and join the conversation!

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By In Announcements, Featured Authors Comments Off on Upcoming Features (including Featured Authors)

Upcoming Features (including Featured Authors)

We wanted to tip you off — and remind you — about a few features upcoming at the Soup in the new year. First, Brad Cokelet has lined up a couple of Featured Philosophers in January he’ll tell you about soon. We also plan to have several journal discussions in the coming year, including from EthicsPhilosophy, Politics, and EconomicsPhilosophy & Public Affairs, and the Oxford Studies series.

We want to remind you of the First Annual PEA Soup Awards. There are numerous awards available, including best posts (for our official contributors), but also best comments (for anyone), and even for posts written elsewhere. We hope that in this New Year these will provide some more incentive to increase regular content on the blog.

Finally, we are introducing yet another new feature (the Soup cannot be stopped, it can only be contained!). We know that many of you are writing books in moral philosophy (which, of course, includes political philosophy, agency and responsibility, moral psychology, etc.), and we’d love to help you draw attention to those books when they’re out (or about to be out). To that end, our new Featured Authors series invites those with new books being published to write posts discussing a main argument in that book that we can then discuss. Authors can link to the book — likely causing a huge spike in sales and the crashing of the website — and authors will also be providing another source of discussion for PEA Soup. Mutual backscratching. If you thus have a book just out or forthcoming you’d like to talk about on the Soup, therefore, please let either of the Davids (Shoemaker or Sobel) know, and we’ll set it up. THIS INVITATION IS NOT RESTRICTED TO OFFICIAL PEA SOUP CONTRIBUTORS! It goes out to all of those in our audience who are working in the field.

Our first featured author will be Victor Tadros, whose new book Wrongs and Crimes has just been published by OUP. His discussion will occur the first week of February.

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By In Announcements Comments (13)

The Death of Derek Parfit

“When I believed the Non-Reductionist View, I also cared more about my inevitable death. After my death, there will [be] no one living who will be me. I can now redescribe this fact. Though there will later be many experiences, none of these experiences will be connected to my present experiences by chains of such direct connections ….  My death will break the more direct relations between my present experiences and future experiences, but it will not break various other relations. This is all there is to the fact that there will be no one living who will be me. Now that I have seen this, my death seems to me less bad…. When I review the arguments for this belief, and reconvince myself, this for a while stuns my natural concern for the future…. Thinking hard about these arguments removes the glass wall between me and others. And, as I have said, I care less about my death. … Can this matter all that much?” (R&P, 281-82)

These are of course the words of Derek Parfit, in Reasons and Persons. Parfit, who died last night, was, in the estimation of many us, perhaps the greatest moral philosopher in our midst. Regardless of whether his death mattered to him, in the end, it matters to the rest of us quite a bit, and it casts a pall on the start of this New Year.

Many of us were deeply influenced by his powerful and broad writings. Others will have tales of his generosity, kindness, and gentleness. We welcome all such stories and remembrances below.

 

 

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By In Announcements Comments Off on Extended Deadline for Murphy Fellowships

Extended Deadline for Murphy Fellowships

The Murphy Institute at Tulane University  has extended its  application deadline for 2017-2018 Center for Ethics and Public Affairs Faculty Fellowships/Visiting Research Professorships. The new deadline is December 31, 2016.

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