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By In Announcements, Featured Philosophers Comments Off on A New Year of Featured Philosophers

A New Year of Featured Philosophers

Happy New Year!  I am happy to announce that we will have a regular series of Featured Philosophers this spring, and that we will be continue to broaden our line up to include junior professors and graduate students.

The first two posters this year will be Reid Blackman, who is an Assistant Professor at Colgate, and David Beglin, who is a finishing graduate student at UC – Riverside.  Reid’s post on role-based reasons and the problems they cause for reasons-internalists will go up tomorrow, so please stop by then and join the conversation!

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By In Announcements, Featured Authors Comments Off on Upcoming Features (including Featured Authors)

Upcoming Features (including Featured Authors)

We wanted to tip you off — and remind you — about a few features upcoming at the Soup in the new year. First, Brad Cokelet has lined up a couple of Featured Philosophers in January he’ll tell you about soon. We also plan to have several journal discussions in the coming year, including from EthicsPhilosophy, Politics, and EconomicsPhilosophy & Public Affairs, and the Oxford Studies series.

We want to remind you of the First Annual PEA Soup Awards. There are numerous awards available, including best posts (for our official contributors), but also best comments (for anyone), and even for posts written elsewhere. We hope that in this New Year these will provide some more incentive to increase regular content on the blog.

Finally, we are introducing yet another new feature (the Soup cannot be stopped, it can only be contained!). We know that many of you are writing books in moral philosophy (which, of course, includes political philosophy, agency and responsibility, moral psychology, etc.), and we’d love to help you draw attention to those books when they’re out (or about to be out). To that end, our new Featured Authors series invites those with new books being published to write posts discussing a main argument in that book that we can then discuss. Authors can link to the book — likely causing a huge spike in sales and the crashing of the website — and authors will also be providing another source of discussion for PEA Soup. Mutual backscratching. If you thus have a book just out or forthcoming you’d like to talk about on the Soup, therefore, please let either of the Davids (Shoemaker or Sobel) know, and we’ll set it up. THIS INVITATION IS NOT RESTRICTED TO OFFICIAL PEA SOUP CONTRIBUTORS! It goes out to all of those in our audience who are working in the field.

Our first featured author will be Victor Tadros, whose new book Wrongs and Crimes has just been published by OUP. His discussion will occur the first week of February.

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By In Announcements Comments (13)

The Death of Derek Parfit

“When I believed the Non-Reductionist View, I also cared more about my inevitable death. After my death, there will [be] no one living who will be me. I can now redescribe this fact. Though there will later be many experiences, none of these experiences will be connected to my present experiences by chains of such direct connections ….  My death will break the more direct relations between my present experiences and future experiences, but it will not break various other relations. This is all there is to the fact that there will be no one living who will be me. Now that I have seen this, my death seems to me less bad…. When I review the arguments for this belief, and reconvince myself, this for a while stuns my natural concern for the future…. Thinking hard about these arguments removes the glass wall between me and others. And, as I have said, I care less about my death. … Can this matter all that much?” (R&P, 281-82)

These are of course the words of Derek Parfit, in Reasons and Persons. Parfit, who died last night, was, in the estimation of many us, perhaps the greatest moral philosopher in our midst. Regardless of whether his death mattered to him, in the end, it matters to the rest of us quite a bit, and it casts a pall on the start of this New Year.

Many of us were deeply influenced by his powerful and broad writings. Others will have tales of his generosity, kindness, and gentleness. We welcome all such stories and remembrances below.

 

 

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By In Announcements Comments Off on Extended Deadline for Murphy Fellowships

Extended Deadline for Murphy Fellowships

The Murphy Institute at Tulane University  has extended its  application deadline for 2017-2018 Center for Ethics and Public Affairs Faculty Fellowships/Visiting Research Professorships. The new deadline is December 31, 2016.

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By In Announcements Comments Off on Announcing the 1st Annual PEA Soup Awards

Announcing the 1st Annual PEA Soup Awards

The Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University and the team at PEA Soup are happy to announce the 1st Annual PEA Soup Awards. We’ll be giving out 28 awards and $4,000 total in prizes to our best contributors and commentators for articles and discussion on PEA Soup posted in the 2016-2017 academic year.

We’ll also be honoring and recognizing the work of ethicists from other online magazines and blogs. For PEA Soup post awards, any published piece between July 2016 and June 2017 is eligible. The same applies to external blog posts for the External Blogging Prize.

We’ve created a separate page for the awards here.

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By In Announcements, Call For Papers, Political Philosophy Comments Off on CFP: PPE Society Panel on Policy Epistemology

CFP: PPE Society Panel on Policy Epistemology

The newly formed Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) Society is hosting its first annual conference from March 16th to March 19th,2017 in New Orleans. The conference contains a variety of panels, and we’re hosting one on policy epistemology. Policy epistemology concerns questions surrounding the ethics of belief and advocacy regarding public policy, especially with respect to those who formulate and implement policy. How much evidence does one require in order to justify an expansion of public health insurance? How high of an evidential bar must empirical evidence satisfy before it can justify legal restrictions, such as regulations on carbon emissions? How should we handle rational disputes about social scientific questions as they bear on public policy? For instance, how seriously should we take the fact that macroeconomic policy is the subject of enormous disputes between expert economists in formulating countercyclical policy? Does disagreement prevent government officials from implementing, say, Keynesian countercyclical economic policy?

If you would like to present at the PPE society on topics falling under the general heading of policy epistemology, I encourage you to submit an abstract of fewer than 250 words to me at kevinvallier@gmail.com before the end of the year, December 31st, 2016.

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By In Announcements, News and Events Comments Off on New Rutgers Lectures In Philosophy

New Rutgers Lectures In Philosophy

Some of the world’s greatest philosophers will visit Rutgers University–New Brunswick over the next five years to present public lectures, hold workshops with faculty and graduate students, and meet with undergraduates.

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