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By In Applied Ethics, News and Events Comments Off on Call for Participation: Climate Ethics and Climate Economics

Call for Participation: Climate Ethics and Climate Economics

Call for Participation

Climate Ethics And Climate Economics: Risk, Uncertainty and Catastrophe Scenarios

Workshop at the University of Cambridge

Convened by Simon Beard (with Kai Spiekermann), supported by the ESRC, in partnership with the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk

8-10 May 2017

Accompanied by public lectures given by Professor Doyne Farmer and Professor Hilary Greaves on the evenings of the 8th and 10th of May.

The fifth of six ESRC-funded workshops on Climate Ethics and Climate Economics.

 

We are now looking for participants.

Confirmed Speakers

Matthew Rendall (University of Nottingham)

John Halstead (University of Oxford)

Elizabeth Baldwin (University of Oxford)

Doyne Farmer (Oxford Martin School)

Tina Sikka (University of Newcastle)

Iñaki San Pedro (University of the Basque Country)

Eike Düvel (University of Graz)

Hilary Greaves (Future of Humanity Institute)

Mariam Thalos (University of Utah)

Kieran Marray (University of Oxford)

Workshop Description

Some scholars, most notably Martin Weitzman (2009; 2011) have warned that there is an uncertain chance of runaway climate change that could devastate the planet. At least since Hans Jonas’s The Imperative of Responsibility (1981), some have argued that even low-probability existential risks should be treated in a fundamentally different way. How should we act when we believe that there is some chance of a catastrophe, but cannot make reliable probability estimates (Elster 1979; Haller 2002; Gardiner 2005)? How much should we worry about worst-case scenarios? What should we do when experts disagree about whether catastrophe is possible?

Papers will be pre-circulated, with short presentations and comments from discussants.

Please pre-register here.

 

 

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By In News and Events Comments Off on World Government or Else? Workshop in Zurich

World Government or Else? Workshop in Zurich

WORLD GOVERNMENT OR ELSE?

The world is encountering several global challenges: climate change, global injustice, and war

particularly stand out. Some think that there is only one adequate answer to these challenges:

to create a world state that governs the entire globe. Others think that creating a world state is

not a good idea for different reasons: it is unrealistic (given as the world it is now dominated

by territorial nation states); it is undesirable (it could lead to global tyranny and/or force upon

humanity a homogeneity that we don’t want); it is ineffective (there are other solutions to these

problems, such as stronger nation states, supra-national organizations, stronger regional

cooperation). This two-day workshop (June 13, 2017 – June 14, 2017) will examine the question

whether we need a world government (and in what form), both from theoretical and from

empirical angles.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: The workshop will last for two days. The first day (June 13) will be

spent at the Collegium Helveticum, Zurich (Switzerland), the second day (June 14) in the

Zukunftskolleg, Konstanz (Germany). A shuttle bus service will be provided between Zurich

and Konstanz on the morning and evening of June 14.

Registration to attend is recommended. Please register with Attila Tanyi by emailing to

tanyi@collegium.ethz.ch

For further details, including a detailed programme when available, see

http://www.attilatanyi.com/future-events.html

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By In Call For Papers, News and Events Comments Off on CFP: “What is Effective Altruism?” Philosophical Quarterly Prize Essay Competition

CFP: “What is Effective Altruism?” Philosophical Quarterly Prize Essay Competition

Win £1500: The Philosophical Quarterly invites submissions for its 2017 international prize essay competition.

What is effective altruism?

What are its core philosophical commitments, and are they tenable?  For example:  is effective altruism compatible with agent-centred partiality for particular charitable causes?  Should non-consequentialists understand benevolence in effective altruist terms?

The Philosophical Quarterly welcomes essays of 8,000 words or fewer addressing these questions.

How to enter

Essays should be typed in double spacing. Electronic submission is preferred and contributions may be sent as email attachments to pq@st-andrews.ac.uk . Most formats are acceptable, but PDF is preferred.

Alternatively, non-electronic submissions may be sent to the address below. Three copies of each essay are required and these will not be returned. All entries will be regarded as submissions for publication in The Philosophical Quarterly , and both winning and non-winning entries judged to be of sufficient quality will be published. The closing date for submissions is 1st November 2017 .

All submissions should be headed ‘What is effective altruism?’ Prize Essay Competition (with the author’s name and address given in a covering letter, but NOT in the essay itself) and sent to:

The Journal Manager
The Philosophical Quarterly
University of St Andrews
KY16 9AR
Scotland
UK

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By In Call For Papers, News and Events Comments (1)

CFP: “The Social Philosophy and Business Ethics of the American Wedding.”

“The Social Philosophy and Business Ethics of the American Wedding.”

 

This conference is about weddings themselves – not about marriage, in general. It will take place at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia on the weekend of November 3-5

 

Select conference presentations will be given by invited speakers, including:

David Velleman

Samantha Brennan

Alastair Norcross

Elizabeth Brake

Daniel Halliday

 

Additionally, the program is open to submissions of long abstracts for 5-7 open presentation slots on the program.

 

We are hoping to solicit abstracts for papers answering questions such as:

  • Is it wrong to make promises that we know we are statistically unlikely to keep?
  • What role does an audience play in promise-making? (And breaking)
  • Commercially, do wedding markets involve wrongful exploitation? If so – whatand whom is being wrongfully exploited?
  • Do wedding markets give rise to problems in business and consumer ethics? (e.g. false advertising; purchasing of products from immoral markets – e.g. diamonds)
  • Are anti-discrimination laws that (arguably) curtail religious freedom appropriately applied in consumer markets related to weddings: e.g. wedding cakes?
  • People spend a lot of money, time, and emotional energy on weddings. Is there any philosophical justification for it? What role do events like this play in the narrative of our lives? Our cultural heritage?
  • Do we owe it to our parents to have weddings – given that there are few other moments of public recognition for the parents of adult children in American social life?
  • Do idealizations about a bride’s body (idealizations about size, age, and virginity) prove to be oppressive (and is there anything interestingly new a philosopher might add to this discussion)?
  • People make religious and cultural compromises when planning their weddings. (e.g. religious compromises to parents) Do these compromises threaten cultural heritage? Do they result in commitments of bad faith?

 

Submit abstracts of 500-750 words to both Brian Berkey and Hallie Liberto at bberkey@wharton.upenn.edu and hallie.liberto@uconn.edu

Deadline for Submission: May 31st, 2017.

Decisions Announced: June 15th, 2017.

Limited funding for travel is available from the conference budget, and will be distributed according to need.

Depending on the breadth and quality of submissions, the conference topic will be the focus of a special issue of Social Theory and Practice, edited by Hallie Liberto. Authors of accepted papers, as well as other highly ranked submissions, will be invited to submit full papers for consideration in the journal.

If you would like to submit a paper solely for consideration in the special issue of Social Theory and Practice, and not for consideration for the conference, please send in your paper by September 1st, 2017.

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By In News and Events, Practical Rationality, Practical reasons, Reasons and rationality Comments Off on SLACRR 2017 Program

SLACRR 2017 Program

St. Louis Annual Conference on Reasons and Rationality 2017

May 21-23, 2017

Keynote: Kieran Setiya (MIT)

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By In Announcements, Call For Papers, News and Events Comments Off on NOWAR 4: Call for Abstracts (Due March 15, 2017)

NOWAR 4: Call for Abstracts (Due March 15, 2017)

This is a call for abstracts for the fourth biennial New Orleans Workshop on Agency and Responsibility (NOWAR), to be held in New Orleans, LA, November 2-4, 2017. Abstracts are welcome on any topic having to do with agency and/or responsibility. Perspectives beyond just those from moral philosophy (e.g., psychology, legal theory, neuroscience, economics, metaphysics, and more) are welcome. To see more about the workshop’s general aims and other details, follow this link.

 

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By In News and Events Comments Off on CFP: Deadline extended for submissions to OSPP

CFP: Deadline extended for submissions to OSPP

We are pleased to announce that the Fifth Workshop for Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy will take place on October 12-15, 2017 in Tucson, Arizona. The deadline for paper submission has been extended to April 1.

There will be nine papers at this year’s workshop, including three invited papers by Kristi Olsen, Victor Tadros, and Daniel Viehoff.

We are issuing a call for papers to fill the remaining six slots. Submitted papers should be between 7,500 and 12,000 words including footnotes, should be totally anonymized, and are due by April 1. Accepted papers for the conference will receive serious consideration for inclusion in the resulting Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy volume. (more…)

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