Normative Ethics
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By In Favorite Papers, Normative Ethics Comments (5)

Favorite papers on: Kantian Ethics

Hoping folks will share with the group their favorite papers on the topic of Kantian ethics. Perhaps people might add what level they think the paper is most appropriate for (grad seminar, undergrad intro, etc.). A short explanation of what the paper says or what makes it great might be useful as well.

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By In Ethics Discussions at PEA Soup, Normative Ethics Comments (4)

Ethics Discussion at PEA Soup: Cheshire Calhoun’s “On Being Content with Imperfection,” with a critical précis by Glen Pettigrove

Welcome to what we expect will be a very interesting and productive discussion of Cheshire Calhoun’s “On Being Content with Imperfection.” The article was published in the most recent issue of Ethics and is available through open access here. Glen Pettigrove has kindly agreed to contribute a critical précis, and it appears immediately below. Please join in the discussion!

Chike Jeffers (more…)

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By In Normative Ethics, Uncategorized Comments (15)

Favorite readings on: Consequentialism

We ask folks to share with the group their favorite papers on the topic of consequentialism. Perhaps people might add what level they think the paper is most appropriate for (grad seminar, undergrad intro, etc.). A short explanation of what the paper says or what makes it great might be useful as well.

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By In Ideas, Normative Ethics, Practical reasons, Value Theory Comments (5)

Panspermia

I have a test case that I’d like to get responses to, one that tests a certain kind of utilitarian intuition, mixed however, with an interesting conflating factor.
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By In Ideas, Moral Psychology, Normative Ethics, Value Theory Comments (3)

Madame Bovary’s Predicament

In this little exercise in analytic existentialism, I’m going to contrast two kinds of stories we can live through, and suggest that the transition from one to the other is both something most of us will experience and a major challenge for finding our lives meaningful. In the sphere of personal relationships, the first kind of story is exemplified by Jane Austen’s novels (among many others), and the second by the setup of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary (among others). I’ll label them Adventure and Service, respectively. Though we’re at least culturally conditioned to prefer the first, there is meaning to be found in both – but perhaps only on condition that we succeed in each of them.
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By In NDPR Discussion Forum, Normative Ethics Comments (8)

NDPR Forum: Elizabeth Barnes’ The Minority Body, reviewed by Stephen Campbell and Joseph Stramondo

Today’s NDPR Forum opens up discussion on Elizabeth Barnes’ book The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability, which was recently reviewed by Stephen Campbell and Joseph Stramondo here. We invite any and all interested parties to discuss any topics in the review or the book, and we are happy to welcome Elizabeth, Stephen, and Joseph to the forum (to discuss however or much or little as they please).

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By In NDPR Discussion Forum, Normative Ethics Comments (22)

NDPR Review Forum: Dale Dorsey’s The Limits of Moral Authority

How often have you read a book review and wondered what the author of the book might say in response to the reviewer? How often have you wanted to chime in and ask some more questions to the reviewer or author in light of a review? How often have you asked yourself rhetorical questions like this and wondered why no one is listening?

PEA Soup listens, and we’re here to end the rhetoric. Today we provide a new forum for discussion of NDPR book reviews of interest to our readers (topics in moral and political philosophy). And while we will invite the authors (of the review and the book) to show up for discussion, we are also inviting readers of the review or the book itself to air any questions or grievances about the book or the review they might have.

We begin with a brand new review by one of our Soupers of a book by another of our Soupers: Doug Portmore’s review of Dale Dorsey’s book The Limits of Moral Authority. Here’s the link to the review. All (relevant, thoughtful) comments on the book or the review are welcome!

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