By In Discussions, Normative Ethics, P&PA Discussions, Value Theory Comments (24)

Philosophy and Public Affairs Discussion at PEA Soup: Theron Pummer’s “Whether and Where to Give” with a critical précis by Johann Frick

Welcome to what we expect to be an engaging and productive discussion of Theron Pummer‘s “Whether and Where to Give.” The paper appears in the Winter 2016 issue of Philosophy and Public Affairs, and it is available through open access here. Our conversation begins below with a critical précis by Johann Frick. Please join in the discussion!

Précis by Johann Frick:

It is a pleasure to kick off our discussion of Theron Pummer’s excellent and thought-provoking article “Whether and Where to Give” (Philosophy & Public Affairs, 2016). I will begin with a brief synopsis of some of Theron’s main claims, followed by some critical comments and questions.

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By In Applied Ethics, Philosophy of Law Comments (0)

Journal of Applied Philosophy Prizewinning Essay

Federico Picinali’s essay, “Base-Rates of Negative Traits: Instructions for Use in Criminal Trials,” has won the Journal of Applied Philosophy’s annual prize (of a thousand pounds) for best essay of the year (in JAP), and it is available to read open access here.

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By In Discussions, P&PA Discussions, Value Theory Comments Off on Upcoming Philosophy and Public Affairs Discussion at PEA Soup: Theron Pummer’s “Whether and Where to Give” with a critical précis by Johann Frick

Upcoming Philosophy and Public Affairs Discussion at PEA Soup: Theron Pummer’s “Whether and Where to Give” with a critical précis by Johann Frick

We are pleased to announce our new discussion series based on recent articles from Philosophy and Public Affairs. Our first article for discussion will be Theron Pummer‘s “Whether and Where to Give,” available here. Here is the paper’s central thesis to whet your appetite:

The main claim I will argue for here is that in many cases it would be wrong of you to give a sum of money to charities that do less good than others you could have given to instead, even if it would not have been wrong of you not to give the money to any charity at all. … What makes my main claim particularly interesting is that it is inconsistent with what appears to be a fairly common assumption in the ethics of giving, according to which if it is not wrong of you to keep some sum of money for yourself, then it is likewise not wrong of you to donate it to any particular charity you choose. Roughly: if it is up to you whether to donate the money, it is also up to you where to donate the money. I will challenge this common assumption.

Johann Frick will start our conversation with a critical précis on April 7. Please join us for what we expect to be a lively and engaging discussion of the ethics of charitable giving.

 

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By In Applied Ethics, Business Ethics Comments (2)

Where Does Business Ethics Happen?

[From the Editors: We’re happy to introduce to you Jeff Moriarty, Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Bentley University, who will occasionally post about a variety of topics pertaining to business ethics. We soon hope to introduce experts in various other fields of applied ethics as well to provide posts about topics in those fields.]

Suppose you have an interest in ethical issues that attend commercial activities and/or productive organizations. Where might you go to learn more, or to present to your work? To a conference in business ethics, of course! But where are those?

Both philosophers (and other normative folks) and social scientists “do” business ethics, though in different ways. Very roughly: philosophers think about what is right in business, while social scientists think about what the causes and effects of right behavior in business are. So it is worth deciding what sort of people you want to talk with before deciding where to go. Here are some options, with the more “philosophical” options at the top, and the more “social science-y” options at the bottom.

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By In NDPR Discussion Forum, Political Philosophy Comments (2)

NDPR Discussion: Ryan Muldoon’s Social Contract Theory for a Diverse World: Beyond Tolerance

NDPR just posted a review by Michael Frazer of Ryan Muldoon’s recent book. We have invited both Ryan and Michael to discuss the review as they see fit, and we also invite interested readers to contribute any questions or comments they may have on either the book or the review here as well.

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By In Discussions, JMP Discussions, Normative Ethics Comments (32)

Journal of Moral Philosophy Discussion at PEA Soup: Molly Gardner’s “On the Strength of the Reason Against Harming,” with a critical précis by Fiona Woollard

Welcome to what will surely be an incredibly interesting and productive discussion of Molly Gardner‘s excellent paper “On the Strength of the Reason Against Harming.” This paper was published in the first issue of this year’s Journal of Moral Philosophy. They have kindly provided free access to the paper, which can be viewed or downloaded here. Fiona Woollard has written a critical précis, which is included below. Please join today’s discussion!

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By In Ideas, Political Philosophy Comments (3)

Relational Egalitarianism and Politics

This is the second installment of PEA Soup’s partnership with Bleeding Heart Libertarians. In this series folks from BHL share their thoughts with Soup readers. This post is by Jessica Flanigan (University of Richmond).

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