By In Announcements, Discussions Comments Off on Top-Viewed 2017 Posts (and teaser for upcoming Kit Wellman forum)

Top-Viewed 2017 Posts (and teaser for upcoming Kit Wellman forum)

What a year! Our first full year on the new site and under the guidance and financial support of the Prindle Institute seemed to have brought many new readers to the scene, as well as many new features and lots of excellent philosophy. Over the next few days, we’ll revisit our top-viewed posts of the year. And teaser: We’ll end the week by opening up a new forum on Kit Wellman’s new book, Rights Forfeiture and Punishment, which will feature familiar discussants from around the world. All are, as always, welcome to join in on the discussion.

We’ll re-introduce the top posts in three groups of five throughout the coming week. Our first group involved featured philosophers, NDPR forums, and journal discussions.

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By In Announcements Comments Off on Philosophy in an Inclusive Key Summer Institute (PIKSI): Time to Apply

Philosophy in an Inclusive Key Summer Institute (PIKSI): Time to Apply

See link for information and instructions for applying here.

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By In Applied Ethics, Ideas Comments (7)

Ethics in the News: The Initials-Etching Surgeon

What are the wrong-making features in this case? These are what seem to be the relevant details:

“According to British news reports, Mr. Bramhall, 53, admitted to using an argon beam — an electrified gas jet that liver surgeons typically employ to stanch bleeding or to mark an area of operation on an organ — to etch “SB,” his initials, onto the livers. Argon beam marks are usually not harmful and would normally disappear. But they were apparently discovered by a colleague when one of the patients underwent a follow-up operation.”

Suppose instead he had sewn a suture in a distinctive way, his “signature style.” Would that too have been “assault”?

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By In The Profession Comments Off on Graduate student tuition taxation

Graduate student tuition taxation

It appears the final GOP bill will not make tuition remission for graduate students taxable.

Sen. Mike Rounds, Republican of South Dakota, told Bloomberg: “Folks who are in grad school will feel pretty good about the final result.”

Story here.

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By In The Profession Comments Off on Philosophers’ Imprint Seeking Editors

Philosophers’ Imprint Seeking Editors

Daily Nous has the full story here.

Imprint is an impressive open access journal. Its mission statement is vital reading. The journal deserves our support. Consider helping them out.

I’ll cut and paste their Mission Statement below. It offers a vision of what the future of journals in philosophy could be like if we banded together to help out journals such as Phil Imprint and together work to transfer prestige to such journals. (more…)

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By In Ideas Comments (8)

Cliched Thanksgiving Post: What moral philosophy are YOU thankful for?

As Thanksgiving rolls around, it’s time to pause and take stock of how you got to be who you are, at least as a moral/political philosopher, and what giant’s shoulders you’ve been standing on to see as far as you’ve seen. What’s the ONE moral/political philosophy book or article you’re most thankful for and how did it influence you?

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By In Featured Philosophers, Normative Ethics, Value Theory Comments (13)

Uniqueness (by Gwen Bradford)

I’m happy to introduce our current Featured Philosophy, Gwen Bradford, who teaches at Rice University and has written a creative and insightful book on achievement.  Her post today is on the nature and value of uniqueness.  Please comment with your thoughts about the interesting new territory that Gwen is exploring!

Uniqueness

I have been thinking about uniqueness and its relationship to value.

The issue first arises in one of the important moments in value theory. The orthodox conception of intrinsic value as value strictly in virtue of intrinsic properties was questioned by counterexamples pointing to extrinsic properties generating what’s plausibly intrinsic value. Monroe Beardsley in 1965 wrote this:

One inconvenience of this definition can be brought out as follows: A sheet of postage stamps has been misprinted – the central figure, say, is inverted. …[but] its value is not for the sake of anything else. (Beardsley 1965: 61-62).

(more…)

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